Don’t fire your guns at Hurricane Irma, Florida police warn residents

In Alternative News, Science & Technology

Reservists from Dover Air Force Base, Del., in the 512th Airlift Wing, conducted an off-station training exercise at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., March 29 through April 3 to ensure they are current in all their deployment requirements. Air Force Reserve members from 14 different career fields training in mission readiness and combat related areas and worked together to build wingmanship and teamork.

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Florida police have warned residents not to fire their guns at Hurricane Irma, after a Facebook event went viral inviting people to shoot at the hurricane.

“To clarify, DO NOT shoot weapons @ #Irma. You won’t make it turn around & it will have very dangerous side effects,” the Pasco Sheriff’s office tweeted late Saturday.

Florida police were responding to a Facebook event titled “Shoot at Hurricane Irma”. Over 50,000 people have expressed interest in taking part.

Source: Twitter

Ryon Edwards created the Facebook event and wrote, “Let’s show Irma that we shoot first.”

Many who responded to the event appeared to take it seriously, posting pictures of themselves with firearms and writing that they would indeed be shooting first.

Others understood that the event was tongue-in-cheek.

A graphic was circulated by members of the event showing that if you shoot at a hurricane, there’s a good chance that bullets will twist in the force of the storm and come back at you.

“Bullets come back don’t shoot”, reads the graphic.

Edwards told the BBC earlier in the week that he never expected people to take the event so seriously.

“A combination of stress and boredom made me start the event. The response is a complete and total surprise to me,” the 22-year-old said.

“I never envisioned this event becoming some kind of crazy idea larger than myself.

“It has become something a little out of my control.”

Three hurricanes are gathering force in the Atlantic and may all reach landfall at the same time. Their force and timing is baffling weather scientists.